Alicia Procello Maddox – 5 Reasons Corporate Responsibility is Here to Stay

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Some people prefer to call it corporate responsibility, others sustainability, and some environmental, social and corporate governance (ESG). Regardless of what name you choose, leaders in the field, like Avery Dennison’s Alicia Procello Maddox California, know a company’s financial success relies heavily on its stance on social responsibility, as well as the future of the environment.

Alicia Procello believes what led to this revolution was the long-standing history of corruption scandals in business, accusations of child labor, and a number of environmental accidents in certain prominent companies. As business has gone global, Alicia Procello Maddox California believes the people have begun to hold corporations far more accountable for their practices and expect far better practices out of them.

Corporate Responsibility has become an important issue and the following signs show that its here to stay.

  • Transparency: As the years go by, technology advances and reporting of business and business practices becomes far more transparent. Alicia Maddox California believes that as businesses continue to grow they will become far more transparent.
  • Trust: As businesses grow, they grow in power. As this power grows, the public must give an inordinate amount of trust to businesses. As citizens become more skeptical and able to challenge authority, the corporate leaders must build a stronger ability to establish trust.
  • Community Participation: Businesses are expected and have taken on the challenge of participating more in community outreach and putting together community projects and events. Alicia Maddox has done a lot of similar projects through community outreach at her time at Avery Dennison.
  • UN Engaging Companies: The UN, some of the leaders in preaching sustainability and the like, have reached out to over 8,000 companies in over 145 countries, in order to raise working and environmental standards and practices.
  • New Markets: Alicia Procello Maddox has seen in recent times that businesses have gone from resource takers to market creators. Not only have companies had to be far more responsible with the way they use nature’s resources, but they’ve had to aid the countries in which they take resources from.
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Cisco and Their Initiative to Reduce Greenhouse Gasses – Alicia Maddox California

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One of the most popular and largest tech companies in the world is Cisco. Despite being a dominant corporate force, they are also one of the companies that preach the most about sustainability and believe in the Green initiative the most. Alicia Procello Maddox California, the president of corporate responsibility at Avery Dennison and a huge supporter of sustainability is a big fan of their practices. Alciia Maddox recently championed Cisco, on setting new goals for their plan to vastly reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Starting in 2013, they had their second 5-year plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions worldwide, by a relatively large 40%. And Alicia Maddox California is happy to hear that, after over $50 million in investments, they have reached their goal, one-year ahead of schedule in 2017.

In February of 2013 they had also committed to use electricity generated from renewable sources for at least 25% of their global electricity every year through 2017. Alicia Procello Maddox believed this goal to be quite ambitious, however, they were able to greatly surpass it reaching an astonishing 71% in 2015 and an even better 77% in 2016.

Being a foremost advocate for corporate responsibility and staunch supporter of a greener planet, Alicia Maddox Procello is extremely proud of the accomplishments of Cisco, despite not having to be, they have become the example for many companies around the world of what can be done if you put your resources behind it. Alicia Procello believes that while Cisco’s accomplishments are amazing, more companies around the US, and the world, need to take note, and work to reduce GHG emissions. As these corporations can make an astronomical amount of difference compared to the average, as a result of their massive size and vast influence.

Rights of Indigenous Peoples and Corporate Responsibility – Alicia Procello

Last week The United Nations celebrated its annual International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples. The UN considers a staggering 370 million people, spread over 90 countries to be indigenous. These old-world people speak over 7000 languages, many of which modern linguists still struggle to comprehend. With such an enormous population, the UN has felt the need to declare these people as a sovereign group, providing them a declarative set of laws and rights.

These indigenous peoples have existed for thousands of years, living without any of the modern amenities modern society has come to rely on. These groups live simple lives, mostly devoid of electricity, gas, oil, or solar power, mechanical machinery, or any semblance of modern farming and engineering techniques. Most of these societies shy away from any contact with modern peoples. Yet somehow, they thrive and prosper, expanding their numbers and even inhabiting new lands, every year. As Avery Dennison’s president of corporate responsibility, Alicia Procello Maddox has spent much of her time researching these peoples and their customs realizing that much of their prosperity has to do with their ability to live clean lives, with renewable agricultural techniques and fail-proof methods that have existed for centuries.

Despite their resilient nature, and their centuries of survival, the indigenous people of the world are not without a few threats. Corporations around the world are constantly making efforts to develop the undeveloped areas of the world, areas that the indigenous have called home for hundreds of years. And without a stable set of laws, giving them rights, they simply have no means to fight corporate interests. Alicia Procello Maddox, and others like her, feel it is part of their duty to protect these people and use their influence on local governments to implement these laws.

The UN’s declaration is already in place, has been for many years, however local governments don’t have the impetus to enforce them as they feel doing so, would deter big corporations from spending money of foreign development. However, some corporations have already realized these issue is more than just business, its basic humanity. Corporations have the power to lobby these governments to enforce the laws giving the indigenous rights. This will deem a section of the indigenous land as a sanctuarystate all to itself, while still giving corporations enough area to build and manufacture as they wish.

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Alicia Procello Maddox feels the need for corporations to get involved has never been higher, and when a few of them give in, the rest will follow. The indigenous people are still people, and should be granted the same rights as any of us; regardless of race, culture or creed.

Why workplace giving and volunteering drives employee engagement

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Work environment giving and volunteering can profoundly affect representative engagement. Alicia Procello Maddox got current blog entry from our companions provides some logical knowledge into why this works and difficulties a portion of the conventional ways to deal with representative engagement and maintenance. For reasons, unknown increments in compensation may not be the carrots businesses think they are for holding solid representatives. Understood Worth’s article brings up that it is human instinct to characterize ourselves inside the more extensive setting of our groups. Giving representatives chances to interface with the group and give back through working environment exercises bolsters their need to feel like a dynamic group member and reinforces their sense of duty regarding the association.