Art in a Changing World – Alicia Maddox

_GU82349

As President of Avery Dennison’s corporate foundation, Alicia Procello Maddox spends much of her time looking at the world and how to change it for the better. While much of that has to do with finding renewable sources of energy, and more sustainable farming practices, developing an ability to advance the arts is just as important, especially in a ever-changing world such as ours. Alicia Maddox is a leader, at her company, in her field, and in her life; but in a different way, artists are also leaders. They lead in ways that most corporate executives or war-time generals couldn’t. The best ones, can cause millions of people to explore mysteries of the world and themselves they’ve never thought about before. They manage to use different mediums to make people from different walks of life see, imagine and connect with each other in different ways.

Having been around the world many times, Alicia Procello Maddox, is well aware of the importance of culture, and how culture can be one of the most powerful forces on the planet. From the foods we eat, the clothes we wear, the stories we tell and how we identify ourselves, culture is power. Looking back in history, when countries conquer one another some of the first things taken are the great works of art, terrorist attacks are often plotted on great museums or buildings housing a country’s pieces of arts & culture. Political leaders use arts & culture to gain supporters, build bridges, heal and defeat. Businesses use the arts & culture to gain favor and give their brands identity to gain customers. Even during the congress of Vienna, Beethoven was brought in to compose for leaders of nations around the world.

Alicia Procello believes that the art is the most eloquent of form of human expression, capable of both uniting the world and breaking it apart. It is important that as the years go by, and as the world changes, we use art to bridge the gaps and create a connection to unite people and keep them from the hatred that will destroy us all. Alicia Maddox is a firm believer in the power of change and how change is needed for growth; the arts & culture can lead the world on a positive path to the future.

Advertisements

Rights of Indigenous Peoples and Corporate Responsibility – Alicia Procello

Last week The United Nations celebrated its annual International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples. The UN considers a staggering 370 million people, spread over 90 countries to be indigenous. These old-world people speak over 7000 languages, many of which modern linguists still struggle to comprehend. With such an enormous population, the UN has felt the need to declare these people as a sovereign group, providing them a declarative set of laws and rights.

These indigenous peoples have existed for thousands of years, living without any of the modern amenities modern society has come to rely on. These groups live simple lives, mostly devoid of electricity, gas, oil, or solar power, mechanical machinery, or any semblance of modern farming and engineering techniques. Most of these societies shy away from any contact with modern peoples. Yet somehow, they thrive and prosper, expanding their numbers and even inhabiting new lands, every year. As Avery Dennison’s president of corporate responsibility, Alicia Procello Maddox has spent much of her time researching these peoples and their customs realizing that much of their prosperity has to do with their ability to live clean lives, with renewable agricultural techniques and fail-proof methods that have existed for centuries.

Despite their resilient nature, and their centuries of survival, the indigenous people of the world are not without a few threats. Corporations around the world are constantly making efforts to develop the undeveloped areas of the world, areas that the indigenous have called home for hundreds of years. And without a stable set of laws, giving them rights, they simply have no means to fight corporate interests. Alicia Procello Maddox, and others like her, feel it is part of their duty to protect these people and use their influence on local governments to implement these laws.

The UN’s declaration is already in place, has been for many years, however local governments don’t have the impetus to enforce them as they feel doing so, would deter big corporations from spending money of foreign development. However, some corporations have already realized these issue is more than just business, its basic humanity. Corporations have the power to lobby these governments to enforce the laws giving the indigenous rights. This will deem a section of the indigenous land as a sanctuarystate all to itself, while still giving corporations enough area to build and manufacture as they wish.

088

Alicia Procello Maddox feels the need for corporations to get involved has never been higher, and when a few of them give in, the rest will follow. The indigenous people are still people, and should be granted the same rights as any of us; regardless of race, culture or creed.

Why workplace giving and volunteering drives employee engagement

136

Work environment giving and volunteering can profoundly affect representative engagement. Alicia Procello Maddox got current blog entry from our companions provides some logical knowledge into why this works and difficulties a portion of the conventional ways to deal with representative engagement and maintenance. For reasons, unknown increments in compensation may not be the carrots businesses think they are for holding solid representatives. Understood Worth’s article brings up that it is human instinct to characterize ourselves inside the more extensive setting of our groups. Giving representatives chances to interface with the group and give back through working environment exercises bolsters their need to feel like a dynamic group member and reinforces their sense of duty regarding the association.

Three Things to Experience in Bangladesh

The Sundarbans pic
The Sundarbans
Image: whc.unesco.org

Alicia Procello Maddox, president at the Avery Dennison Foundation in Glendale, California, is proud to invest in philanthropic initiatives around the world. She is always looking to improve lives and widen prospects for those in need. In 2014, Alicia Procello Maddox and her company traveled to Bangladesh to oversee the funding of an NGO that granted scholarships and life skills training to young people from low-income areas. Bangladesh itself is a treasure trove of new experiences and culture. Here are three experiences that cannot be missed:

1. The Sundarbans: This expansive mangrove forest houses over 400 Royal Bengal Tigers, the last of their kind. Visitors can experience a once-in-a-lifetime safari for only around $30, which is a huge bargain, considerig what wildlife awaits.

2. Srimangal: For tea enthusiasts, this area in the northeast is covered in lush green tea gardens, and a distinct lack of crowds. A calming locale, it’s perfect for bike riding and sightseeing, with the Hamham waterfalls nearby.

3. Cox’s Bazar. With the distinction of being the longest sea beach in the world, this paradise is nearly 75 miles long, and also offers religious sites for history buffs. Many resorts have their own private sections of beach to help avoid large crowds.